Tue. Sep 17th, 2019

Articles

It is often said that social media and citizen journalism are destroying the photographer’s profession. In reality, it is the current state of the media and its economic model, and not the level of professionalism and quality of the work being carried out, that are in a state of flux. AnthropoGraphia is proof of this. Thanks to the valuable support we receive from Adrian Evans and Shahidul Alam, AnthropoGraphia is able to present, for the 5th consecutive year, a series of human-interest stories that won’t appear on the front pages of our newspapers.
At our meeting in London, in mid-May, human rights were the focus of discussion, with photography seen as a means and not an end.
Visual narration is, indeed, a very powerful tool when used to bear witness in denouncing human rights violations. In this process of choosing a winner and awarding a prize, we were drawn to
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“There’s something wrong with human nature” (Gary Clail 1991), but judging by the entries to this year’s AnthropoGraphia awards, there’s nothing wrong with the state of human rights photography. With stories from every corner of the globe we should be thankful so many photographers are willing to devote their time and energy to reporting human rights abuses wherever they are. In turn, AnthropoGraphia should be praised for providing a much-needed platform for their work.

In a chance symmetry, AnthropoGraphia’s two winners – Liu Jie and Francois Pesant – shine a light on stories from the world’s two superpowers, China and the USA. In Liu Jie’s case, he takes a familiar issue and presents it in a powerful and original way that makes us feel as if we are seeing the story for the first time. The missing chairs in his photographs bring home to us the human impact of

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